2021-04-18 10:42:29

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ENGLISH Pneumatic machinery, aside from results due to the elasticity of air, is analogous in operation to hydraulic machinery.As soon as they had got all the information they required, the commanding officer ordered a patrol of cyclists of six men to leave their kit and rifles behind, but to take a Browning, and deliver a rapidly written letter at Lige.They did not understand, of course, that poor Belgium would have liked nothing better than to remain neutral also.

(1.) Why have belts been found better than shafts for transmitting power through long distances?(2.) What are the conditions which limit the speed of belts?(3.) Why cannot belts be employed to communicate positive movement?(4.) Would a common belt transmit motion positively, if there were no slip on the pulleys?(5.) Name some of the circumstances to be considered in comparing belts with gearing or shafts as a means of transmitting power.Machine motion is mainly rotary; and as rotary motion is accomplished by cylindrical parts such as shafts, bearings, pulleys and wheels, we find that the greater share of machine tools are directed to preparing cylindrical forms. If we note the area of the turned, bored and drilled surface in ordinary machinery, and compare with the amount of planed surface, we will find the former not less than as two to one in the finer class of machinery, and as three to one in the coarser class; from this may be estimated approximately the proportion of tools required for operating on cylindrical surfaces and plane surfaces; assuming the cutting tools to have the same capacity in the two cases, the proportion will be as three to one. This difference between the number of machines required for cylindrical and plane surfaces is farther increased, when we consider that tools act continually on cylindrical surfaces and intermittently on plane surfaces.On Thursday, August 20th, I decided to go once more in the direction of Tongres. As the Germans had picketed the main road along the Netherland frontier, I made a detour and dragged my bicycle across the mountain near Petit Laney, a very trying job in the stifling heat. From the mountain top I had a beautiful vista, which enabled me to see that near Riemst a large German force was encamped at which I desired to have a look. So I walked down the hill to Canne, where some crofters were trying to get their cattle into The Netherlands. These poor creatures, who usually own two or three head of cattle, had been compelled already to give up half of their stock. From Canne I cut through corn and beetroot fields to the road to Riemst. The first German sentinels were tolerably friendly.

"5. Van Zuylen, senator.The mission house had become a sanctuary for a good many people. As bread was lacking, two brothers fried pancakes all day long and distributed them among the numberless persons who asked for food. Among these were people who a few days earlier belonged to the well-to-do, but who saw their business, in which often more than their own capital was invested, wrecked by fire, and were now obliged to appeal to the charity of these monks. Indeed during the first weeks after that terrible event many starved, and I assisted often at the distribution of the pancakes, because they were short-handed.Connected with screw dies, there are various problems, such as clearance behind the cutting edge; whether an odd or even number of edges are best; how many threads require to be bevelled at the starting point; and many other matters about which there are no determined rules. The diversity of opinion that will be met with on these points, and in reference to taps, the form of screw-threads, and so on, will convince a learner of the intricacies in this apparently simple matter of cutting screw-threads.

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Punctuality costs nothing, and buys a great deal; a learner who reaches the shop a quarter of an hour before starting time, and spends that time in looking about, manifests thereby an interest in the work, and avails himself of an important privilege, one of the most effectual in gaining shop knowledge. Ten minutes spent in walking about, noting the changes wrought in the work from day to day, furnishes constant material for thought, and acquaints a learner with many things which would otherwise escape attention. It requires, however, no little care and discrimination to avoid a kind of resentment which workmen feel in having their work examined, especially if they have met with an accident or made a mistake, and when such inspection is thought to be [168] prompted by curiosity only. The better plan in such cases is to ask permission to examine work in such a way that no one will hear the request except the person addressed; such an application generally will secure both consent and explanation.4. The cost of construction and durability.I was really sorry that I had dressed myself in that grey Norfolk suit, long stockings, a knapsack strapped to the back, and a leather strap with a water-bottle. The unfortunate creatures thought that I was a German soldier. I was bewildered for a moment, but then guessed their thoughts and hastened to comfort them.

"Come, come," I replied, touched by the kind anxiety of these people. "Come, come; it won't be as bad as all that, and, then, I am a Netherlander."In practice this difference of effect on the top and bottom, or between the anvil and hammer sides of a piece, is much greater than would be supposed. The yielding of the soft metal on the top cushions the blow and protects the under side from the force. The effect produced by a blow struck upon hot iron cannot be estimated by the force of the blow; it requires, to use a technical term, a certain amount of force to "start" the iron, and anything less than this force has but little effect in moving the particles and changing the form of a piece.Was the gun I had seen there one of the notorious forty-two centimetre monsters? I should not like to wager my head in affirming that. It was an inordinately unwieldy and heavy piece of ordnance, but during the first days of the war nothing or very little had yet been said or written about these forty-two's, and I did not pay sufficient attention to the one I saw. Only after the fall of Loncin did all those articles about the forty-two's appear in the papers, and the Germans certainly asserted that they destroyed Loncin by means of such a cannon.

"We beseech all residents in the municipality to guard the highest interests of all the inhabitants and of those who are hostages of the German Army, and not to commit any assault on the soldiers of this army.Before I got to the bridge I saw something gruesome: a number of corpses of soldiers were lying about and others were brought in ... a little farther away, on the farm, there they were digging.... I looked away quickly; I was not yet accustomed to that sort of thing. Most likely they were men killed a moment ago by shells aimed at the bridge, for wounded men were also brought in on stretchers.

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Of course I did not allow the little girl to go by herself, but took her with me. It was a wearying expedition in the excessive heat of that day. Very soon the child was no longer able to carry her small belongings, and, though already sufficiently loaded myself, I had to take her bundle as well. She was scarcely able to walk more than a thousand yards at a stretch, and had then to sit down on the grass by50 the roadside and rest. She did not quite understand what was going on, but she had an undefined feeling of fear on that long, deserted road, where we did not meet anybody except some well-hidden or stealthily moving German patrols who suddenly pointed their rifles at us.

Near Haccourt, by the bank of the Meuse, I noticed a terrible glare of fire and dense smoke. It was an alarming sight, and made me fear the direst things. I considered for a moment whether I should go there or not, fearing that I had already taxed my nerves too much. Yet, I made up my mind to go, and by a side-way got to the Meuse, near Vis. German engineers were busy here laying telephone wires, and an officer stopped me, threatening me with his revolver. It was obvious that they were no longer accustomed to see civilians on that road. After having examined my passport and seeing that I was a Netherland journalist, he became very friendly, and politely urged me not to go farther.

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Apr-18 10:42:29